English

International

Welcome

Offers for foreign students/teachers and interested persons.

 

Exchange students:

Erasmus+

Are you interested in a semester, a practical project or in writing your thesis at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences?

You are welcome to have a study stay at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences in the framework of an Erasmus+ cooperation agreement between your university and our university.

Akkordeon Erasmus+

First apply at your home university for an exchange period at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences. Your international office will send us your nomination and contact details, so that we can get in touch with you.

After that, please fill in these forms:

Sign and send them together with your Transcript of Records to Cornelia Lorenz.

Your application will be reviewed by us and the chosen department. If you are accepted, you will receive a written notification thereof as soon as possible. In addition, you will receive a list of contact persons of your department from whom you can obtain further information about your study stay.

For the winter term: May 31
For the summer term: November 30

Higher education cooperations

Study stays and internships at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences are also possible due to higher education cooperations with partner universities in Brasil (Santa Catarina State University, Florianópolis), Russia (Kazan State Technological University or Ufa State Petroleum Technological University), Thailand (Naresuan University, Phitsanulok) and Ukraine (National Technical University of Ukraine, Kiev).

Please ask at the international office of your university for information regarding grants, application requirements and dates.

After the application at the international office of your university, you will be invited by Merseburg University of Applied Sciences. Please notice, that you will need a visa for your study stay here in Germany.

Courses in English

For Engineers

Department of Engineering and Natural Sciences

Course description will follow soon.

  • Skills: Get to know relevant components and systems, their electrical behaviour and rules for their application 
  • Course Content:
    • Solar Cells and Modules
    • Converter Systems
    • Wind Power Systems
    • Biomass Systems
    • Fuel Cell Systems
    • Electric Storage Systems
    • Operation of Decentralized Fed Electric Grids
  • Requirements: Basics of Electrical Engineering, Electric Power Systems
  • Type of Exams: Oral exam
  • Credits: 2
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Jörg Scheffler
  • Skills: VHDL and FPGA programming
  • Course Content: VHDL, design and simulation and programming
  • Requirements: Digital circuit design, understand programmable logic
  • Type of Exams: Documentation (app. 20 - 25 pages) and 20 min lecture
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Steffen Becker
  • Skills: Students will acquire knowledge in the field of electrical and electronic engineering. After the course they are able to:
    •     Understand and analyse electrical and electronic components and circuits,
    •     Design electric and electronic circuits and
    •     Apply electric and electronic circuits.
  • Course Content:
    • Basic Circuit Theory
    • The Analysis of DC Circuits
    • The Dynamics of Circuits
    • The Analysis of AC Circuits
    • Power in AC Circuits
    • Semiconductor Diodes
    • Semiconductor Transistors
    • Digital Electronics
  • Requirements: Basic knowledge in mathematics
  • Type of Exams: Written examination
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Bernhard Bundschuh
  • Skills:
    • Basic knowledge about the design of FRP, economic relevance of FRP in the areas of mechanical engineering, boat, aircraft and wind turbine design
    • Knowledge about different fibres and matrix systems and their specific characteristics
    • Fibre behaviour within matrix, characteristics and parameters
    • Possibilities for processing of FRP
    • Test methods for FRP

Students are able to judge the possibilities for FRP applications under aspects of economy, technological requirements and risks and opportunities of manufacturing process.

  • Course Content:
    • Introduction, history of FRP processing, opportunities, economic development
    • Fibres: Glass, aramid, CFK, natural fibres
    • Matrices: UP, VE, EP, phenol molding resin, thermoplastics, Fibre-matrix-bonding
    • Fibres in compound materials
    • Continuous filaments, fibre fraction, fibre prolongation, behaviour under pressure
    • Staple fibres: orientation, shrinkage/warpage, pigments
    • Stress-strain-diagram, firmness, elasticity, collapse behaviour
    • Processing of FRP: Semi-finished products
    • Cast resins, Thermoplastic matrices
    • Mechanical testing: crack formation, fatigue behaviour
  • Requirements: Enrolment in an engineering science (Master), Bachelor students only upon request with regards to content: Knowledge about the description of material properties (TM II)
  • Type of Exams: Written examination, design and manufacturing of a test structure in FRP
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr.-Ing. A. Merklinger
  • Skills:
    • Foundations of the physical chemistry of polymers and their characterization methods
    • Overview of analytical techniques for polymers
    • Learning to perform basic polymer analyses using different techniques
    • Writing of scientific reports

The students should be able to apply and evaluate the basic principles of polymer characterization method.

  • Course Content (Lecture):
    • Statistical treatment of analytical data
    • Special chromatographic techniques for the investigation of polymers and polymer additives
    • Principles and instrumental parameters in molecule spectroscopy (IR- and Raman spectroscopy)
    • Thermal analytical methods for the characterization of chemical and physical properties of polymers
    • Basic principles of analytical chemistry
    • Chemical equation, Stoichiometry
  • Course Content (Lab course):
    • Extraction of additives and analysis of extracts and residual. monomers by GC/MS
    • Elastomer characterization by TMA
    • Qualitative analysis of polymers and copolymers by FTIR spectroscopy (MIR or NIR)
    • Mn of polymers by vapour pressure osmometry or membrane osmometry
  • Requirements: None
  • Type of Exams: Written exam
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Bernhard Reinhold
  • Skills:
    • The students will learn standard formalisms and algorithms how to use logic in the fields of computerscience and engineering. They acquire the capability to apply these methods.
  • Course Content
    • Propositional Logic
    • Predicate Logic
    • Logic Based Knowledge Representation
    • Other Types of Logic
  • Requirements: None
  • Type of Exams: Oral (30 Min.)
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4 SWS
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dr. Michael Schenke
  • Skills: The students will get enhanced knowledge in the field of modern digital mobile communications. After the course they are able to:
    • Describe the tasks and background of the current digital mobile communication standards,
    • Name the main network elements and their function and
    • Denote the fundamental principles, algorithms and protocols of these standards.
  • Course Content:
    • Introduction in mobile communication concepts
    • GSM system for mobile communication
    • 3rd generation system - UMTS
    • Efficient packet data transfer with HSPA
    • LTE as a 4th generation system
  • Requirements: Basics in communications systems, Principles of computer networks
  • Type of Exams: Oral examination (30 minutes)
  • Credits: 2.5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 2
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Jens Mückenheim
  • Skills:
    • Perform a model-based development
    • Generate control software from moduls using rapid software prototyping
    • Perform tests with optional hardware or software in the loop

Through the group work in the internship team ability is strengthened.

  • Course Content:
    • Modeling in the development of mechatronic systems (VDI 2206)
    • Tools for modeling: MATLAB/Simulink and dSPACE
    • HiL (hardware-in-the-loop) and SiL (software-in-the-loop)
    • Visualization of the results
    • Rapid software prototyping
    • Examples
  • Requirements: Knowledge of control engineering, mechatronic systems, MATLAB/Simulink
  • Type of Exams: Final presentation
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Manfred Lohöfener
  • Skills:
    • Basic theoretical and advanced experimental methodic knowledge of piezoelectric transducers
    • Development, setup and characterization of ultrasound transducers for typical applications
    • Basic knowledge of measurement and simulation of mechanical and electrical properties of piezoelectric sensors and actuators
  • Course Content:
    • Fundamentals of piezoelectricity, piezoelectric materials, design and modelling of (ultra-)sound transducers, simulation and measurement of (ultra-)sound fields, piezoelectric actuators
    • Seminar: current sensor developments
    • Practical course: construction of an ultrasound transducer incl. design, setup characterization and application test
  • Requirements: Physics I, Physics II (Sensor Technology recommended)
  • Type of Exams: Oral examination, written protocol/seminar paper
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Klaus-V. Jenderka
  • Skills:
    • Acquiring perspectives for the work as a polymer scientist or polymer engineer
    • Acquiring a basic knowledge about testing polymer materials
    • Practical skills for mechanical and physical testing of polymer materials
  • Course Content (Lecture):
    • Basics of melt flow
    • Extrusion
    • Injection molding
    • Spinning, foaming
    • Elastomer processing
    • Processing tires
    • Blown film extrusion
    • Recycling of polymer materials
  • Course Content (Polymer Processing Lab):
    • Extrusion
    • Injection molding
    • Elastomer processing
    • Blown film extrusion
  • Requirements: Basic knowledge about polymer materials
  • Type of Exams:
    • Completion of lab course protocols
    • Written exam
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. P. Michel
  • Skills:
    • Acquiring perspectives for the work as a polymer scientist or polymer engineer
    • Acquiring a basic knowledge about testing polymer materials
    • Practical skills for mechanical and physical testing of polymer materials
  • Course Content (Lecture):
    • Elastic, visco-elastic and plastic deformation behaviour of polymer materials and phenomenological models, quasi-static test methods of polymer materials (tensile, compression, bending), hardness measurement and test methods, charpy impact test
    • Instrumented impact tests as methods for toughness characterisations of polymer materials, Fracture mechanic concepts for polymer materials
  • Course Content (Polymer Testing Lab):
    • Content item: characterisation of elastic properties, tensile test, bend test, ball indentation test, Charpy impact test, drop weight test, tensile impact test
  • Requirements: Knowledge about polymer materials
  • Type of Exams:
    • Completion of lab course protocols
    • Written exam
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Beate Langer

Skills: After finishing the module, the students are able to

  • Program functions in M-script
  • Model differential equations and transfer functions with block diagrams and
  • Design control algorithms with block diagrams

Course Content:

  • The students work with MATLAB and Simulink to solve tasks of modelling and simulation of differential equations and transfer functions with M-scripts and with block diagrams in time domain and in Laplace domain for the design of control applications.
  • The students get to know modelling on the levels Model-in-the-Loop MiL, Software-in-the-Loop SiL and Hardware-in-the-Loop HiL.

Requirements: Knowledge in control engineering and linear systems
Type of Exams: Successful completion of all practical experiments
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Manfred Lohöfener

  • Skills:
    • Knowledge about interaction of bubbles and economic crises, implication to German and worldwide activities in the field of energy supply
    • Analysing of the current state concerning energy supply of a company
    • Creating of strategies for fitting the energy supply to the needs (personal, operational, social)
  • Course Content:
    • Bubbles and economic crises
    • Strategies for energy supply
    • Different kinds of renewable energies
    • Concept for sustainable energy supply
    • Way to sustainable energy supply
    • Social frame condition for the promotion of investments into sustainable energies
    • Storage based systems to fit supply and needs
    • Experimental work to solarthermal systems, photovoltaic, heat pumps, simulation of the transfer from conventional to sustainable energy supply
  • Requirements: Knowledge of the English language, thermodynamics, electrical and thermal energy technologies, macroeconomic
  • Type of Exams: Oral examination at the end of the experiments, simulation as advance for the written examination
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dietmar Bendix
  • Skills:
    • The students will know the fundamental machine models and the standard methods for the description of formal languages
    • They are aware of the necessity of abstract descriptions and capable to work with them
    • They can apply the models and method and see connections between them
    • They can deal with the unsolvability of problems
  • Course Content
    • Regular languages, finite automata, regular expressions
    • Context-free languages, grammars, stack automata, derivation trees
    • Logic based knowledge representation
    • Turing machines, decidability
    • Foundations of complexity theory
  • Requirements: None
  • Type of Exams: Oral (30 Min.)
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4 SWS
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dr. Michael Schenke
  • Skills:
    • Students are familiar with experimental methods, used to determine physical quantities of state as well as to determine quantities representing mass-, energy- and momentum transport in fluids- and energy engineering.
    • Students gain a profound understanding of transport phenomena, thermal apparatuses and fluidmachinery by validating considerations, which were introduced in previous classes, in lab experiments.
    • Students know modern measurement instrumentation and the physical principals behind it. This enables them, to design the appropriate instrumentation for process control in industrial installations (containig fluids) later on.
    • After extensive laboratory experiments students are trained in critical interpretation of measurement results, discovering measurement errors, determine measurement accuracy and finally validate their chosen procedure with respect to theory.
    • Students are familiar with test procedures to determine performance and efficiency of fluid machinery and thermal apparatuses.
    • Students are able to compose a complete professional test report of their lab experiments.
  • Course Content:
    • Review of fundamentals of fluid- and thermal engineering (fluid dynamics, 1st and 2nd law of thermodynamics , heat- and mass transfer) and its application to industrial installations (f.e. heating systems, water supply, thermal power stations, chemical process plants).
    • Introduction to measurement methods and technologies applied in the range of laboratory experiments as well as in the range of industrial process control (water supply, heating systems, chemical process plants)
  • Laboratory Work - Projects:
    • Flow velocity determination by laboratory methods (Pitot tube, Prandtl tube) and its application to flow rate determination
    • Determination of friction coefficients of turbulent pipe flows under different conditions and validation of the results by means of the Moody-Chart or the Colebrook-Equation
    • Determination of drain time of a water tank with falling head using different exit conditions and comparing the results with a simulation forecast
    • Determination of convection heat transfer coefficients in turbulent air flow, variing the influencing parameters (velocity, duct geometry)
    • Determination of the time history of heat transfer coefficients when cooling down a heated metal block by natural convection, using two different approaches
    • Determination of heat transfer rate and efficiency of single pass pipe in tube heat exchangers under different conditions (parallel and counter flow as well as parallel and serious connection of several pipe in tube heat exchangers)
    • Determination of performance data and effiency of turbo pumps according to international standards under different operating conditions.
  • Requirements: Successful completions of basic courses in Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamics and Engineering Basics (Physics, Mathematics)
  • Type of Exams: Successful completion of the lab sessions including final reports, written exam 90 min
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Martin Staiger
  • Skills:
    • Basic theoretical and advanced experimental methodic knowledge of ultrasound physics
    • Understanding of linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound in gas, fluids and solids
    • Expertise in practical applications of signal and power ultrasound
  • Course Content:
    • Generation and Propagation of Ultrasound, medical applications (ultrasound imaging methods, 3D imaging, elastography, Doppler sonography, ultrasound tissue characterization, ultrasound therapy),
    • Non-destructive testing with ultrasound, high power applications (ultrasound cleaning, sonochemistry)
  • Requirements: Physics I, Physics II (Ultrasound Technology recommended)
  • Type of Exams: Oral examination, written protocol/seminar paper
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Klaus-V. Jenderka

Social Work. Media. Culture (Module)

Seminars from this module can be combined with a language course in the Language Centre, which will give you 2.5 extra more credits above the 2.5 credits for the seminars listed below. 

Social Work. Media. Culture (Module)

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: The aspect of "participation in cultural life" in the context of disabilities will be addressed. Barriers are to be identified both in the field of reception of art and in its production. In addition, the museum component will be addressed (presentation and inclusion-oriented art mediation). The art historical terms "Art Brut" and "Outsider Art" will be critically reflected. The course combines theory (e.g. assistance concepts, empowerment, cultural participation) with practice. In the field of artistic practice, genres will be tested that are particularly suitable for heterogeneous groups.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, Tuesday 13:30-16:45, start: 21 May 2019.
Type of Exams: Marked project (such as presentation in class)
University Teacher: Prof. Frederik Poppe, module contact person will be Esther Stahl

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: In a four-day seminar, we will examine the system of social care in Sweden: basic principles, historical background, laws, and regulations and their practical application in social work; for example, social service for families and youth, social psychiatry, and integration of refugees. The students should get an insight into the Swedish social system. They should apply their knowledge of social care in Germany in a comparative way so as to be able to describe some concrete advantages and disadvantages between the two different systems.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5. Active participation is the prerequisite for obtaining credits. Graded credits can be gained for a paper (in English or in German). Content will be agreed upon during the seminar.
Teaching Hours per Week: September 23 - 26, 2019, 9.15 am - 4.45 pm
University Teachers: Karsten Mohapatra, Lina Helgstrand, Module contact person will be Esther Stahl.

This seminar is also open for social work practitioners from outside of Hochschule Merseburg (fee: EUR 260). If interested, please write an e-mail to Prof. Herwig-Lempp.

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: Dance in education has become popular over the last few years. We will explore with contemporary dance, create our own movement, analyze best practise projects and find principles to work with non-professional groups with dance. In the end you will choreograph your own dancepiece!

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, Wednesday 13:30-15:00 pm
Type of Exam: Choreography of a dancepiece
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Nana Eger, module contact person will be Esther Stahl

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: In this seminar we regard the internet as both an intermediary and mediator of sex. As an intermediary, the internet can act as another pathway to meeting sexual partners. Alternatively, digital venues based around digital communities of (sexual) practices, where fantasies and tastes are played with, illustrate the potential for the Internet and digital media to intrinsically alter sexuality, and become an active element in shaping sexual encounters. This topic is important for both Culture&Media Education and Social Work students as it talks about digital culture and influence on the one side and secondly it is a relevant topic for prospective social workers working with teenagers who are increasingly shaping and being shaped by the digital world.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week:
Only one course has to be chosen:
Group A: Wednesday 3.15 – 4.45 pm
Group B:. Wednesday 5 – 6.30 pm

Type of Exams: Presentation
University Teacher: Esther Stahl

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: To be able to read academic texts in English and interpret scientific surveys in English is important both for the bachelor thesis as well as to get a broader idea of the respective topics in one’s field of expertise. That’s why this seminar focusses on the practice in reading, summarizing and talking about academic texts and scientific surveys. We will get to know relevant vocabulary as well as reading skills that will make it easier to get a quick overview of the main aspects of the text. We will practice on literature and surveys in the field of culture, media and pedagogy as well as social studies.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: Monday 9:15 – 11:45 am
Type of Exams: Presentation of a text or survey
University Teacher: Esther Stahl

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: Description will be announced soon.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, Thursday 11:00 - 12:30
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Stefan Meise, module contact person will be Esther Stahl.

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: Play Therapy is a special approach that uses playing as a method and a form of communication to help people, especially children aged 3 to 11, to prevent or resolve psychosocial challenges. In this seminar we will discuss the idea of “Homo Ludens” in the context of therapy focusing on identity and its relevance to the culture of childhood. In the very practical main part of the seminar we will get to know the use of (hand) puppets in Play Therapy by exercising in small groups. Besides, participants will become familiar with methods of the systemic approach. The preparatory meeting is obligatory to arrange participation and project attribution!

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: Preparatory meeting: May 6, 2019, 1:30 - 3 pm (obligatory meeting). Seminar: 22 - 25 July, 2019, 9.15 am - 4.45 pm
Type of Exams: Poster/Presentation
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Paulick, module contact person will be Esther Stahl

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: Here we will work on the creation of a Cannabis-Knowledge Base. In a pragmatic way of working we will develop English-language definitions and relations in order to map them in a simple and clear way. The result of that work will be an ontology – in our case this realized by means of a graphic mind map of things and relations concerning the topic ‘medical cannabis’.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week:
Fr, 05.04.2019, 9:15 – 16:45
Sa, 06.04.2019, 9:15 – 16:45
Fr, 03.05.2019, 9:15 – 16:45
Sa, 04.05.2019, 9:15 – 15:00

Type of Exam: Project work
University Teacher: Marvin Däumichen, module contact person will be Esther Stahl

This seminar is part of an international cooperation between Sapir College in Sderot (Israel) and Merseburg University of Applied Sciences.

Skills: By the end of the seminar the participants will have gained:

  • A historical perspective of rights-based social work practice.
  • An understanding of the different contexts for the application of rights-based social work practice.
  • An understanding of the different levels of disentitlement and how disentitlement works to disempower individuals and communities.
  • Basic rights-based practice language.
  • Knowledge of the strategies and tactics of rights-based social work practice.
  • Knowledge of different models of rights-based social work practice.
  • Relevant knowledge and practice skills to begin to work as rights-based social work practitioners.

Course Content: This seminar will focus on rights-based social work practice and the role that such practice can play in empowering individuals and building community, particularly among communities of diversity, communities that have been excluded and marginalized and communities in conflict. Two colleagues from Israel, Dr. Merav Moshe-Grodofsky, chair of the School of Social Work at Sapir College and Amit Kitain, director of MEZACH (Rights-based Community Practice Center Network) will present a theoretical social work approach as well as its practical application. Together with Johannes Herwig-Lempp from Merseburg, we will also try to develop ideas as to how this approach could be made useful/put to practice in German Social Work.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5. Credits can be received for consistent participation during the entire seminar and for active engagement. Graded credits can be gained for a paper (in English or in German). Content will be agreed upon during the seminar.
Teaching Hours per Week: July 22 - 25, 2019, 9.15 am - 4.45 pm
University Teacher: Prof. Johannes Herwig-Lempp, Dr. Merav Moshe-Grodofsky and Amit Kitain. Module contact person will be Esther Stahl.

This seminar is also open for social work practitioners from outside of Hochschule Merseburg (fee: EUR 260). If interested, please write an e-mail to Prof. Herwig-Lempp.

Skills: Students will learn to

  • Discuss and hold their own position in English despite their actual language skills
  • Express themselves confidently in a foreign language
  • Empathize with people who are confronted with language barriers on a daily basis
  • Understand academic literature in English (reading comprehension) and summarize it in their own words
  • Understand English media content in their own field of studies and summarize it in their own words. 
  • Obtain English information about topics specific to their own field of studies in other countries.

Course Content: What role does disability play in contemporary film? In the seminar, international film productions (e.g. USA and Scandinavia) will be shown in English language and discussed afterwards. The focus is on disability in the context of social participation.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: Tuesday, 17:00-19:15, 2 SWS, ends on 18 June 2019
Type of Exam: Each participant writes an essay about one of the films and moderates the discussion in cooperation with the seminar leader. Regular and active participation is expected to ensure that the stated teaching content is communicated and that the desired teaching objectives can be achieved.
University Teacher: Prof. Frederik Poppe, module contact person will be Esther Stahl

Social Work. Media. Culture (Courses)

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar, we will focus on exemplary identitarian ideologies and realities in the 20th and 21st century. After studying concepts and realities of 'classic' radical right-wing authoritarian ultra nationalism in Italy and Germany, we will turn to more contemporary examples of fascist ideology, aesthetics and communication. Students learn to understand and differentiate different types of essentialist constructions of identity.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, block seminars
Type of Exams: Oral presentation and Handout
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar we will explore and analyze how adult education in liberal democracies addresses the contemporary rise of right-wing populism. In class, we will practically work with materials from different national contexts and evaluate them together. Our goal is to develop and practice productive arguments and strategies against right-wing populism in simulation. The seminar language is English; advanced language skills are not necessary to participate in this course!

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, block seminars
Type of Exams: Studybook / Seminar Paper
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar we will take a focus on what it means to be a grown-up in modern democratic societies. We will discuss social, political and legal conceptions of adulthood to develop an understanding of what is unique and what is shared in different life periods of the increasingly diversified 'landscape of adult life'.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2 SWS, weekly course or block seminar
Type of Exams: Seminar Paper
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: Buzzwords like a "crisis of the welfare state", "globalization" and "post-welfare" in "post-industrial societies" describe changing political realities; at the same time, innovative ideas like a "basic income" challenge old understandings of welfare. In this seminar we will take scientific and public discourse on contemporary social policy into analytical focus and practice our language and argumentation skills. We will discuss old and new roles and functions of the welfare state in (trans-)national economies and learn how to write short and comprehensive texts about complex issues.

Requirements: Active participation (production of studybook)
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: Wednesday, 17:00 - 18:30 pm
Type of Exams: Short paper (500 Words) and oral examination
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar we will study and practice the scientific use of English in debates and discussions about social work and related theories. We will do text analyses to identify typical and useful concepts and constructions that help us making and communicating our arguments more precisely and transparently in both academic and everyday situations.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
Type of Exams: Seminar Paper, Presentation of Results
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar we will learn, experience and document cultural diversity in the local area in and around Merseburg. We will do field-trips and take different ways of life, cultural scenes and events into focus. Participants learn basic elements of empirical field work and practice intercultural communication and language skills. Students are asked to do an interview and produce a documentation of local cultural diversity.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
Type of Exams: Seminar Paper, Presentation of Results
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: “How can I help you to get rid of me?” “How could you worsen your situation?” Although rather unusual at a first glance, these questions are an integral part of the standard repertoire of questions used when applying methods, theories and mindsets of systemic social work. It is a solution and resource-oriented approach, which is of great importance to social work. It is based on a constructivist view of the world as well an understanding that people have “eigensinn” (ownership of their own perspectives), i.e. they are autonomous. In addition to unusual questions, many other tools of systemic social work will be used in this seminar. By taking part in exercises in small groups, participants will get the opportunity to become familiar with the systemic social work approach and explore its effectiveness and benefits. Throughout the four-day course, active participation is the prerequisite for obtaining credits.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: Four-day course: from 16 to 19 March 2020
University Teacher: Prof. Dr Herwig-Lempp

Skills/Course Content:

  • Key concepts about race(ism) and nation(alism)
  • Historical and contemporary development of concepts, theories and ideologies

Requirements: None
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
Type of Exams: Seminar Paper, Presentation of Results
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Skills/Course Content: In this seminar we will take online dating into focus. We will try to understand the meaning and function of 'modern dating' offered by popular platforms like tinder and okcupit. We will explore and analyze typical values, aesthetics, identity construction and social techniques of the user-communities.

Requirements: None
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
Type of Exams: Seminar Paper, Presentation of Results
University Teacher: Lukas Boehnke

Language courses

Skills:

  • Being able to communicate successfully in an English-speaking environment
  • Being able to keep up a conversation on a fairly wide range of general, job-related and familiar subject-specific topics
  • Using standard structures of written and oral communication appropriately
  • Understanding relevant written and spoken information on common business topics

Course Content:

  • Social English: e. g. introductions and greetings; presenting yourself in a professional way
  • Getting to know the company; describing job activities; making arrangements; writing e-mails
  • Brands/Advertising
  • Money/Finance
  • Business Travel
  • Globalization
  • Basic structures (verb tenses, conditional clauses, passive)

Requirements: General English skills at level B2 or equivalent
Type of Exams: Written examination
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 6
University Teacher: t.b.a.

Skills:

  • Advance your grammar and vocabulary that is of particular importance in written and spoken communication
  • Development of your abilities in reading, writing, listening and speaking in a business context
  • Enabling you to participate in discussions and meetings

Course Content: The course includes a variety of topics, e.g.

  • General Communications and Teamwork
  • Planning and Running Projects
  • Communication in International Project Teams
  • Conflict Resolution

Requirements: General English skills at Upper-Intermediate Level
Type of Exams: Written Examination: Reading, Writing, Use of English
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Deborah Le Guillou

Skills:

  • You will develop your abilities in reading, writing, listening and speaking in an academic context
  • You will learn about academic culture and study methods in an English-speaking environment
  • You will focus on grammar and vocabulary that is of particular importance in academic written and spoken communication
  • You will acquire skills enabling you to participate in lectures, tutorials, workshops and conferences

Course Content: The course includes a variety of topics, e.g.

  • Academic Orientation
  • Choices and Implications
  • Risks and Hazards
  • Language and Communication
  • Difference and Diversity
  • Work and Equality

Requirements: General English skills at Upper-Intermediate Level
Type of Exams: 4 tests
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teachers: Deborah Le Guillou, Uwe Schiffke

Skills:

  • Reading comprehension of German texts, correspondence, comments and interviews at elementary level to basic/general level about specific topics
  • Listening comprehension at elementary level
  • Speaking skills
  • Presenting in German

Course Content:

  • Introductions
  • Meeting people
  • My profession/occupation
  • Small talk
  • Summarizing
  • Reading techniques
  • Presentations, grammar and vocabulary exercises for students, dialogues and video units
  • Listening

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Written examination, oral examination
Credits: 2
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
University Teacher: t.b.a.

Skills:

  • Reading comprehension of German texts, presentations, lectures, comments und interviews at intermediate to upper-intermediate levels of interdisciplinary and subject related topics
  • Conversation in a professional setting; explaining and understanding different phenomena
  • Presentations and negotiations in German

Course Content:

  • Methods for presenting scientific investigations and research in: hypothesis, providing a structure, methods for quoting, summarizing
  • Methods for reading texts at upper-intermediate level, presentations, grammar and vocabulary exercises for students, dialogues, video units and listening exercises

Requirements: Basic knowledge of German at level A2/B1
Type of Exams: Written examination, oral examination
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Svetlana Telepneva

Skills:

  • Teaching of intercultural competence and applied geography knowledge
  • Conversation in a professional setting: explaining and understanding cultural phenomena, intercultural differences and gained awareness/cognition
  • Presentations and negotiations in German
  • Summarizing an issue
  • Discussing

Course Content:
Methods for presenting and interchange sociologic and sociolinguistic knowledge/awareness ‘Study Visit in Germany’: for instance the personal intercultural experience of

  • Stereotypes
  • Expectations before arriving
  • Comparisons/contrasts, self-perception vs. public perception, opinion about foreigners
  • Experience exchange
  • Applied geography, politics, economy, culture, education system, music, language etc.

Getting to know German traditions/rules/customs: guideline to the business world, studying, everyday life, dealing with public authorities and private persons.

Requirements: German at level B1, English at level B1
Type of Exams: Written report in German or English / 6 pages without pictures
Credits: 2
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
University Teacher: Svetlana Telepneva

Skills:

  • Reading comprehension of French texts, correspondence, comments and interviews at elementary to basic/general and subject-specific topics
  • Listening comprehension at elementary basic level
  • Speaking skills
  • Presenting in Spanish

Course Content:

  • Introductions
  • Meeting people
  • My profession/occupation
  • Small talk
  • Summarizing
  • Reading techniques
  • Presentations, grammar and vocabulary exercises for students, dialogues and video units
  • Listening

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Written examination, oral examination
Credits: 2
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
University Teacher: Oda Brauer

Skills:

  • Being able to communicate successfully in an English-speaking environment
  • Being able to discuss a wide range of general, job-related and familiar subject-specific topics
  • Being able to explain technical phenomena and specific processes
  • Understanding relevant written and spoken information (instructions, reports, interviews, presentations, lectures)

Course Content:

  • Technical Functions and Applications
  • Describing Technical Processes
  • Engineering Design
  • Energy Engineering
  • Automation/Robotics
  • New Developments in Science & Technology
  • Explaining Tests & Experiments
  • Recycling/Waste Management
  • Complex Linguistic Structures
  • Applying for a job/internship

Requirements: English skills at Common European Framework (CEF) Level B2 (or equivalent)
Type of Exams: Written and oral examination
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: t.b.a.

 

 

For Business Students

Department of Business Administration and Information Sciences

Knowledge: Students know and understand

  • Basic theories relevant to the field of Human Resource Management (HRM) and leadership
  • Common HR problems and practical HR applications and concepts used in organizations of all sizes; current and future challenges to HRM

Skills:

  • To understand and critically reflect basic HR knowledge and to deepen it independently
  • To analyze and define the role of HR management and line managers in typical organizational situations, find practical solutions and justify as well as implement them
  • To expediently communicate with others and reach goals together
  • To autonomously search for material, critically analyze texts and achieve reasonable results

Course Content: Human Resource Management A (Summer term)

  • Basics of Human Resource Management and Leadership:
    • Roles, tasks and value contribution of HRM; history
    • Leadership theories and leadership styles
    • Leadership tasks and instruments
    • HR structures (e.g. business partner, model; HR shared services, HR outsourcing)
    • Strategic Human Resource Management
  • Culture and Diversity
    • Corporate culture
    • Diversity management, demographics
    • Rule compliance
  • Recruitment and Marketing
    • Needs planning and HR marketing
    • Target group approach and relationship management
    • “Talent management”
  • Selection and Onboarding
    • Principles and instruments of personnel selection (e.g. job interviews, application documents, assessment centers)
    • Hiring (contract negotiation and draft; onboarding)
  • Separation and Retention
    • Personnel reduction and individual separation; support measures (e.g. “Transfergesellschaften”; “outplacement”)
    • Employee retention
  • Personnel Development and Organizational Development
    • Qualification needs analysis and evaluation
    • Internal/external training
    • Coaching, job rotation, career planning
    • Apprenticeship and development programs; self-development
    • Knowledge and innovation management; “corporate universities”
    • Organizational Development

Course Content: Human Resource Management B (Winter term)

  • HR Administration/HR metrics/Labor Relations
    • Administration (e.g. personnel files, payroll services, HRIS, applicant management, HR reporting)
    • Measuring HR (e.g. HR figures, cost planning, risk controlling)
    • Collaboration with the works council and labor unions
  • Basics of Organization
    • Theoretical aspects of organizing
    • Design and documentation of organizational structures and processes
    • Centralization, Outsourcing, Offshoring
  • Work Task and Performance Management
    • Assignments, delegation and “management by objectives”
    • Working time models and workplace design/workplace resources
    • Feedback systems and performance appraisals
  • Motivation and Compensation
    • Motivation theory and rewards systems
    • Compensation and benefits (e.g. pension plans)
  • Collaboration in Teams
    • Coordinative communication in teams
    • Cooperation, conflict management and team development
  • Health and Change
    • Health Management; stress reduction
    • Work-life balance and family support
    • Change management

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Written examination
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Boris Kaehler

Skills: Students gain an overview about the development of the globalization with related institutions, common market entry strategies of firms and marketing activities for doing business in other countries.

They learn to understand the drivers of offering products and services in other cultural areas to B2C customers. In the lecture, students will individually examine market entry strategies and doing business of case study companies. They present their research results in the course for discussion. Thus, they learn to define own research topics and examine relevant issues in international business and management.

Course Content:

Globalization and international institutions

  • Brief history of globalization
  • From GATT to World Trade Organizations
  • European Union, Nafta and ASEAN

Market selection and market entry strategies

  • Export Management
  • Foreign direct investments (FDI)
  • Joint Ventures

National Cultures and cultural intelligence
Products and pricing in international markets
Communication in international markets
Sales policy in international markets
Student's presentations

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Oral presentation and seminar thesis
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Doreen Pick

Skills:

  • Basic insight into the concepts
  • Tasks and methods of Financial Management
  • Acquire the methodological skills: to realize financial goals, to make decision, to make processes and to control
  • Gain an understanding of the function of Financial Management in organizations and
  • Understand the relations with external market participants
  • Planning- and controlling techniques and cost management
  • Students know and understand:
    • Foundations of International Financial Management
    • The foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination and currency derivatives
    • Foreign exchange exposure and management
    • World financial markets and institutions
    • Financial management of the multinational Firm
    • Managing currency risk
    • Financing international operations
    • International management of working capital

Course Content:

  • Foundations of International Financial Management
    • International monetary system and balance of payment
    • Corporate governance around the world
    • Evolution and behavioral definition of multinational corporations
    • Global competition
  • Foreign Exchange Market, Exposure and Management
    • Exchange Rate Determination
    • Currency and Derivatives Markets
    • Management of Transaction, Economic and Translation Exposure
  • World Financial Markets and Institutions
    • International Banking, Money- , Bond- and Equity Markets
    • Interest Rate, Currency Swaps and Int. Portfolio Investment
  • Financial Management of the Multinational Firm
    • Foreign Direct Investment and Cross-Border Acquisitions
    • International Capital Structure, Capital Budgeting, Multinational Cash Management
    • International Trade Finance, Tax Environment and Transfer Pricing
  • Managing Currency Risk
    • Translation and Transaction Exposure
    • Economic Exposure
  • Financing International Operations
    • International and Domestic Capital Markets
    • International Financial Markets
    • International Cost of Capital
  • International Management of Working Capital
    • International Trade Management
    • Financial Management for the Global Enterprise

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Written examination
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Sven Petersen, Michael Rode

Skills: The students

  • can conduct a literature research
  • can choose adequate research methods
  • can use adequate research methods
  • can present their findings on an international conference
  • can document their findings in a publishable form

Course Content:

  • Theoretical introduction into Mobility especially E-mobility
  • Theoretical Introduction into "scientific writing" and "how to make a survey"
  • Literature research
  • Research for the Case Studies on e-mobility in Merseburg
  • Gathering ideas for the improvement of mobility in Merseburg
  • Group work
  • Workshops, Excursions in and out of Germany

Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Seminar paper and presentation
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Sackmann, M.Sc. Emma Elisa Zimbelmann, M.Sc. Larissa Lößer

Learning Outcomes:
Students possess skills to communicate and to present as well as other competencies (e.g. negotiation). The requirement structure is characterized by complexity and frequent changes (level 3-5).

Competencies:
Students possess knowledge, working methods and behavior skills in the areas of methodical, self  and social competence. They are able to apply these situationally. Students recognize their own strengths and weaknesses during the application of this knowledge,  working techniques and behavior skills. They can reflect their individual behavior in concrete situations of daily business life, regulate it and improve it by learning.

Course Content:
The module teaches and consolidates selected content in the abovementioned competence fields, especially communication, presentation and feedback. Additionally, the following competencies may be taught: moderation, time management & self-organization, negotiation, memory training.

Requirements: None
Type of Exams:
1. Presentation with use of media (50%) (covers the communication and presentation part)
2. Written examination (30 min) (50%) (covers other competencies)
Credits: 5
Teaching Hours per Week: 4
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Boris Kaehler

Skills: Students can define the area of responsibility of management accounting. Students can name reasons for development and significance of the management accounting function. Students can create a customized planning, control, and information supply system. Students can calculate common cost methods.

Course Content: Basic principles management accounting, plan and check systems, information supply systems, consulting and advisory
Requirements: None
Type of Exams: Written examination
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Thomas Rachfall

Skills/Competences:

Students gain an overview about strategic marketing and the marketing mix of companies. The fundamentals of marketing will be examined with a case study about a real marketing strategy of a company. Different questions will be discussed in the sessions. Similar to the case study, students will do research for their own case study of a company's marketing mix. They present their research results in the course for discussion in front of the course participants. Thus, they learn to define their own research topics, learn to transfer theoretical approaches to practice and they deepen their social and presentation skills. They further practice to write a seminar thesis as part of your course work and thus prepare for the bachelor thesis.

Course Content:

  • Introduction
    • Markets and definition of marketing
    • What is a relevant market
    • Market segmentation
  • Marketing Strategy
    • Methods for analysing a company‘s situation
    • Market goals
    • Marketing strategy
  • Elements of the Marketing mix
    • Product policy
    • Price policy
    • Communication policy
    • Sales and sales management
  • Case studies of the students

Requirements: Knowledge of basics of marketing is suggested but not necessary
Type of Exams: Oral presentation and written seminar thesis
Credits: 2.5
Teaching Hours per Week: 2
University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Doreen Pick

  • Skills:
    • Knowledge about the field of activities and design options in Supply Chain Management
    • Application methods in inventory positioning and lot sizing in the deterministic case and cases of demand uncertainty
    • Application of tools and methods in designing supply networks
    • Awareness of the requirements of global logistics
    • Application of methods in risk management
    • Certain methods in risk management in supply networks
    • Finding the right pricing strategy for goods facing a changing customer demand in segmented markets
  • Course Content:
    • Inventory management: enhanced static economic lot sizing, newsvendor model, inventory holding policies, dynamic economic lot sizing, risk pooling
    • Network planning: locations, capacities, service level
    • Supply contracts: make-to-stock and make-to-order decisions, information asymmetry
    • Global logistics: risks and chances, risk management
    • Smart pricing
  • Requirements: Basic logistics knowledge on lot sizing and order policies
  • Type of Exams: Written examination
  • Credits: 5
  • Teaching Hours per Week: 4
  • University Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Sackmann

Courses in German can be found on the websites of our departments:

FAQ

Students coming from Europe (normally) do not need a visa for a study stay in Germany.

Students from non-EU countries do need a visa for the purpose of studying (student visa). We advise you to contact the German Embassy or Consulate.

Information on visa regulations can be found here.

Yes. Students wishing to study in Germany must have health insurance coverage.

Students from Europe can use their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) as a proof of health insurance cover. Students from non-EU countries need a statutory health insurance for their visa but also for the matriculation at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences.

At Merseburg University of Applied Sciences you do not pay any tuition fees!

The Studentenwerk charges a semester fee of circa EUR 195 per semester. It supports student meals, students cultural projects, social services and renovation projects. A semester ticket is also included. More information can be found here.

A single room on the campus costs EUR 248 per month + one-time charge of EUR 300 deposit.

The health insurance costs circa EUR 90 per month.

Up-to-date travel information can be found here.

If you are arriving at Leipzig/Halle Airport, take the S-Bahn (City Train) or the Regionalexpress to Halle/Saale. The IC or ICE is much more expensive. Make sure you retain your train ticket from Leipzig as it includes your bus fare from Merseburg station to the campus!

Here you will find our cooperation partners.

Local Residents' Registration Office

Within the first week after your arrival, you need to register at the local authorities (even for a temporary stay). The proof of residence registration is needed to open a bank account. You will need your passport and visa (if necessary) and your rental contract.

Each student receives EUR 75 from the city of Merseburg if they agree that their permanent address is in Merseburg. So, apply straight away for this bonus when you go to the local residents' registration office.

 

Foreigners' Registration Office

Students from non-EU countries planning to stay in Merseburg for over three months, must register at the foreigners' registration office. You will need your passport and visa (if necessary), two biometric passport photos, the proof of residence registration, your matriculation certificate and proof of health insurance.

 

If you have any trouble filling in the registration forms, our buddies will help you and, if necessary, take you along to all the offices.

More information about studying in Germany:

Study in Germany (website)

Experiences of incoming students

"My stay in Merseburg was unforgettable. Everybody in the lab was professional, friendly and flexible. Also, the international office team was amazing, always trying to help us and the buddies were always our saviors. We had parties, barbecue, weekend trips together or met at somebody's flat to have fun. I never felt lonely there and as a gift, I am now part of an international family. So, I would definitely recommend an exchange period in Merseburg."

- Carolina Costa
Exchange Student from Portugal

 

"My study stay at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences was great. I will take unforgettable moments, experiences and knowledge from the courses home. It made me very happy to get to know people from other countries and to learn about their cultures. I would definitely recommend everyone to have a study stay in Merseburg."

- Monika Skrbková
Exchange Student from Czech Republic

 

"Thank you very much for having me and giving this opportunity to participate in an exchange! It has been a great experience."

- Elena Rashitova
Exchange Student from the Russian Federation

Aktuelles

Experience Report from a Brazilian Student

02.01.2019, Erfahrungsberichte (Incoming)

Study stay at HoMe during summer semester 2017.

Mehr

Buddy Service

Apart from helping you solve any problems you may have, our student buddies will organise trips and social events for you. These social 'get-togethers' are intended to help you get to know lots of people very quickly. Our buddies will regularly inform you by Facebook on important events. Our Facebook group can be found here.

Pick-up service: Please let us know, when and where you will arrive. We will try to arrange a pick-up service for you at Merseburg station. Try to avoid arriving on weekends or on a public holiday.

Tips

During your scheduled study period in Merseburg accommodation is available in the form of guest rooms, located directly on the university campus. The rooms are fully furnished. Mattress, quilt, pillow and bed linen are provided. In the shared kitchen all the necessary household items (such as cooking utensils, pots and pans, cutlery and electric kettle) are available to all. The bathroom is a communal bathroom (two bathrooms for five to six people). The common area is equipped with tables, chairs and a TV.

All rooms have access to the internet. Please pay your first month rent and the deposit upon arrival in cash. You can not pay by credit card. Annette Losse is your contact person to apply for a room.

Single room (14.3 m³):

  • Rate per month: EUR 248
  • Deposit: EUR 300

Photos of the accommodation can be found in the gallery.

Here you will find information regarding semester dates and public holidays.

In Germany most shops are closed on public holidays.

Deposit System

In Germany there is a deposit system for most cans, plastic and glass bottles. Deposits range from 8 cents to 25 cents, so it is advisable to return these bottles and cans to the supermarkets.

Campus

"Before participating in the Erasmus+ Exchange Program in Merseburg, I was quite worried about language, school and exams. After one unforgettable year, I can now confidently say that I don't have any regrets about studying in Merseburg. Friendly students, great buddies, professor's friendly attitude, professional student service from the international office and lots of events for students. I'm really grateful for one of the best years of my student life." Ondřej Svoboda, Exchange Student from Czech Republic

Contact International Office / Language Centre

The members of the International Office will be available prior and during your stay in Merseburg. Furthermore, they are the contact persons for language courses at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences.

Dr. Gabi Meister
Leiterin International Office/Language Centre
Raum: Hg/G/1/21
Telefon: +49 3461 46-2307
Cornelia Lorenz
Sach- und Finanzbearbeitung sowie Incoming/Outgoing von Studierenden
Raum: Hg/G/1/24
Catharina Schulten
Koordinatorin für internationale Angelegenheiten
Raum: Hg/G/1/23
Telefon: +49 3461 46-2295
Annette Losse
Sekretärin sowie Incoming/Outgoing von Studierenden
Raum: Hg/G/1/23
Telefon: +49 3461 46-2294

Students with families and care obligations

If you are planning on spending a part or all of your studies abroad, the Merseburg University of Applied Sciences (UAS) would be very happy to welcome you and your family in the beautiful and historical town of Merseburg as a student. As part of the audit “family-friendly university” (Familiengerechte Hochschule), the Merseburg University of Applied Sciences committed itself to implement family-friendly policies and facilitate an inclusive environment for both students and employees with families. Furthermore, we strive to enable every person with obligations to care for family members or with the need for care through their own impairments to be an active and vital part of our UAS. As an audited institution we offer a variety of options specifically implemented for you as a parent or caretaker. They include:

  • the office for family and care matters (Familienbüro) as a counselling centre for general questions regarding studying and working at the Merseburg UAS with family and care obligations
  • parent-child-room for individual use and baby-care rooms on campus
  • possibility to apply for a customised class timetable
  • assistance in finding a daycare facility nearby or transitional care at the child care facility “CampusKids” of the UAS (transitional and emergency care only)
  • children’s menu at the UAS’s canteen free of charge (via Student Services)

For more and specific information and counselling please contact:

familienbuero@hs-merseburg.de

Offers for refugees

Refugees Welcome@HoMe
We would like to give you a warm welcome at Merseburg University of Applied Sciences. As a refugee, you are eligible to study at a German university, especially when your refugee status is recognized. In terms of applying and gaining admission to a degree program, you will be treated just like any other international student applicant.

Kontaktperson
Kristin Hesse
Coordinator for Counselling and Supporting Refugees at Hochschule Merseburg, (University of Applied Sciences)
Raum: Main Building, Counselling office in room G/1/29
Telefon: +49 3461 46-2345
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